Sunday, 9 November 2014

Soul Reaver Widescreen Fix: Goddammit Square-Enix




If you head over to Steam or GOG right now and purchase a digital copy of Legacy of Kain: Soul Reaver, you will be provided with the v1.2 patched version released by Crystal Dynamics in 1999, tweaked to run on Windows 7 at higher than standard resolutions. This version, however, is locked at a 4:3 aspect ratio and 30 frames per second.

Head over to Nosgothica.org, and you can download an easy to install patch, 376Kb in size, that enables proper widescreen and unlocks the frame rate cap. This patch, originally released on the official Legacy of Kain forum by user Tos, was made available in October 2010.

Four years ago.

If there's one thing that pisses me off, it's when fans of a game have to put together their own patches to add minor features that are ubiquitous to modern gaming. I mean, Tor's patch takes milliseconds to download and no more than a minute or so to apply. How can it be that Square-Enix haven't adopted the patch, or released their own version, considering Soul Reaver is still being sold for £4.99?

Considering I'm on a Legacy of Kain binge, I've already looked ahead and found similar patches for Soul Reaver 2 and Blood Omen 2, as well as an extensive retexture mod for Legacy of Kain: Defiance.

This isn't to mention the likes of Peter “Durante” Thorman and his resolution cap removal fixes for Dark Souls, Metal Gear Rising, the recently released PC version of Final Fantasy XIII and more. In those cases developers have no excuses whatsoever to officially adopt these mods, or provide their own official patches.

I mean, isn't this the kind of stuff the videogame press should be consistently highlighting in order to pressurise publishers and developers into providing their paying consumers with better products?

Well, I guess it doesn't matter, because videogames are art, or something. Whatever.

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